Images for October and November calendar pages as described in image caption.
Book of Hours, Use of Rome, Philadelphia Museum of Art 1945-65-13. Page-turning interface on the desktop, left; manuscript downloaded to a tablet and page enlarged to show detail. Now you can read your manuscripts on the bus!

Turn pages on your desktop!
Download entire manuscripts to your tablet!
Compare pages from different manuscripts using IIIF!

Earlier this fall, the BiblioPhilly project team uploaded all 475 manuscripts to the Internet Archive, offering new possibilities for researchers and the general public. The collection, which can be reached at http://archive.org/details/bibliotheca-philadelphiensis, can be searched by date, topic/subject, holding institution, and language. Manuscripts can be viewed in the Internet Archive’s page-turning interface, or downloaded in a range of formats.

For the illustration above, we chose the November calendar page from Philadelphia Museum of Art 1945-65-13 (because it’s November). You can see it here: https://archive.org/details/1945_65_13/page/n35 . Shown at left, the page-turning interface on the desktop. Shown at right, the pdf version displayed on an iPad and zoomed in to show detail.

In addition, placing the BiblioPhilly manuscripts on Internet Archive makes them IIIF compliant — fully interoperable for comparison, annotation, and portability, as noted by Stanford Curator of Manuscripts Ben Albritton @bla222). Albritton offers a brief and clear tutorial in this Twitter thread: https://twitter.com/bla222/status/1175097259907633153?s=20 . The Internet Archive also provides a FAQ here: https://archive.readme.io/docs/ia-iiif-faqs

The project is now complete — except for any addition manuscripts PACSCL member libraries may acquire or uncover in their collections, and except for two exhibitions that will be mounted in early 2020. More about the project:

BiblioPhilly was generously funded by a grant from the Hidden Collections initiative of the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR). The Hidden Collections initiative in turn is supported by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.